Writers Respond: What I Learned At AWP 2012 [3/3]

As anyone involved in the lit world knows, this past weekend was the annual AWP conference. Unfortunately, I was unable to find my way to Chicago for the event. Luckily, many gracious writers, editors, and publishers did go, and I asked them one question:

“What did you learn at AWP 2012?”

They gave me some great responses, which you can read below.

[Note: This is part three of a three-part series. You can read part one here, and part two here. For more features like this, subscribe via RSS or email.]

I learned that the best chocolates are not at the biggest booths, the best beers are not in the hotel bars, and the best panels are not the ones you attended.

Daniel Grandbois, author of Unlucky Lucky Days

This year I invented giving away books at the bookfair — Broder, Mullany and Sirois gave away dozens of signed copies — which was made affordable thanks to not registering for the conference, and was made necessary thanks to how badly it hurts my soul to try to sell books I love to disinterested, eye-glazed strangers.

Adam Robinson, founding editor of Publishing Genius Press & author of Adam Robison and Other Poems Continue reading “Writers Respond: What I Learned At AWP 2012 [3/3]”

Writers Respond: What I Learned At AWP 2012 [2/3]

As anyone involved in the lit world knows, this past weekend was the annual AWP conference. Unfortunately, I was unable to find my way to Chicago for the event. Luckily, many gracious writers, editors, and publishers did go, and I asked them one question:

“What did you learn at AWP 2012?”

They gave me some great responses, which you can read below.

[Note: This is part two of a three-part series. Read part one here and part three here – or better yet, subscribe via RSS or email.]

I learned how to use the Chicago subway system.

Melissa Broder, author of Meat Heart & When You Say One Thing But Mean Your Mother

1) literary events are more often about drinking with other writers than listening to them read; 2) if you want an audience, you have to rock the mic; 3) the most rewarding experiences tend to be the least trendy; 4) the DJ/dance part of the “Literature Party” should be subtitled “Geeks on Parade”; 5) short skirts and tall boots sell books; 6) many writers are alcoholics and it’s not glamorous; 7) you really can get laid at these things.

Jesus Angel Garcia, author of Badbadbad Continue reading “Writers Respond: What I Learned At AWP 2012 [2/3]”

Writers Respond: What I Learned At AWP 2012 [1/3]

As anyone involved in the lit world knows, this past weekend was the annual AWP conference. Unfortunately, I was unable to find my way to Chicago for the event. Luckily, many gracious writers, editors, and publishers did go, and I asked them one question:

“What did you learn at AWP 2012?”

They gave me some great responses, which you can read below.

[Note: This is part one of a three-part series. Read part 2 here and part3 here. – or better yet, subscribe via RSS or email.]

It’s easy to give in to the belief that everyone in the small press / indie lit / AWP writing scene are all on some fake ass, circle jerk, social bullshit, then you arrive at AWP and remember that people are amazing, full of love and life and talent and energy and creativity and goodness and you forget how / why / when you ever even forgot that in the first place.

Barry Graham, author of Nothing Or Next To Nothing & The National Virginity Pledge

I learned that social media, despite its many problems, is oddly good at indicating what someone will be like in person. I met a lot of people whom I had previously known by only their avatar photos and status updates. And there were no surprises. And no bad apples, either. Writers are good bunch. Underrated, even.

Brad Listi, author of Attention. Deficit. Disorder. & founder of The Nervous Breakdown Continue reading “Writers Respond: What I Learned At AWP 2012 [1/3]”